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PRESS RELEASEPACE Now logo
For immediate release
August 17, 2016

Contact: Steve Patterson, A2E2, steve@arkansasadvancedenergy.com or
(501) 658-1215 cell

Fayetteville, Springdale Combine to Double PACE District's Size
State's First PACE District Now Serves Property Owners in Two NWA Cities

August 17, 2016 — The state's first Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) district has doubled in size with the addition of the City of Springdale. The district was originally formed by the City of Fayetteville 18 months ago.

Recent actions by both Fayetteville and Springdale city councils formalized the expansion. The district board will expand from seven to nine members. Two Springdale citizens, Micah Thompson and Steve Miller, were appointed in August and two more will be appointed to serve in place of Fayetteville Board members when their terms expire on Dec. 31, 2016. Beginning in 2017, the positions of Board Chair and Vice-Chair will alternate annually between the two cities.

The current board is comprised of Chairman Frank Mayfield and board members Cameron Baker, Don Bennett, James Bell, Sarah Marsh, Michael Phipps and Matt Pope, all residents of Fayetteville.

"Our city is pleased to be joining the City of Fayetteville in offering our property owners the opportunity to seek low-cost financing for energy improvements," said Doug Sprouse, Mayor of Springdale. "PACE can be a valuable economic development tool that saves property owners money and makes their buildings more valuable."

As it was originally designed by the City of Fayetteville in 2014, the ordinance creating Energy Improvement District Number One includes a provision that encourages other jurisdictions to join with composition of the board subject to agreement between the parties.

"With interest in PACE continuing to grow, this is the right time to expand the district to include our neighboring city," said Mayor Lioneld Jordan, City of Fayetteville. "Now, the cities of Fayetteville and Springdale can work together to save energy costs for our property owners and bring clean energy jobs to the region."

Signed into law by Governor Beebe in April 2013, the Arkansas local-option PACE program authorizes the voluntary creation of energy improvement districts to fund loans for 100% of the cost of energy savings projects by interested property owners. The loans are repaid via a special assessment on the owner's property. Loan payments are generally less than the amount of energy savings achieved, so most business owners experience an increase in cash flow. Without access to low-cost financing opportunities, Arkansas property owners must typically bear the upfront costs of energy-saving projects, an obstacle that has stymied many energy-saving projects in Arkansas.

The Fayetteville-Springdale PACE District is administered by Arkansas Advanced Energy Equity (A2E2), which reports that the Springdale Chamber of Commerce has already become that city's first property owner to apply for PACE financing. A2E2 energy consultants are currently assessing the Chamber's facility at 202 West Emma Avenue to determine eligible projects and potential savings.

Background:
Arkansas Advanced Energy Equity Program (A2E2) is an innovative method for eligible commercial property owners within the Cities of Fayetteville and Springdale to access 100% property-assessed financing for energy efficiency, renewable energy, and water conservation property improvements. The program is administered by A2E2, LLC on behalf of the Cities of Fayetteville and Springdale, AR Energy Improvement District, Frank Mayfield, Chairman. A2E2, LLC was incorporated in Arkansas in 2014 as a joint venture by the Arkansas Advanced Energy Association (AAEA) and Energy Equity Funding (EEF), a company that also administers Set the PACE St. Louis.

A2E2.net is the online portal that customers and contractors can use to explore the benefits of PACE financing and learn whether certain property improvements are eligible. Property owners may use the website to submit preliminary applications for project financing and contractors may register online to participate in the program.

Property owners can learn more about qualifications and eligible projects by visiting this link.

To learn more about benefits for certified contractors in the A2E2 PACE program, visit this link.


Energy-efficiency loans on tap
New county program offers funds to upgrade buildings

By Brandon Mulder

Posted: July 28, 2016 at 3:22 a.m.

A loan program to help businesses retrofit their buildings with energy-efficiency upgrades is now underway in Pulaski County after more than a year of discussion.

Last week county officials finalized the Property Assessed Clean Energy program and are ready to accept applications from business and property owners within the county limits.

The program allows owners to borrow money for energy-efficiency improvements -- like adding insulation, installing solar panels, or upgrading cooling systems -- and pay it back over time, therefore mitigating the sticker shock of upfront costs. Instead of making traditional loan payments, the money would be paid back as an add-on to property-tax bills.

Upgrades under the program are required by state law to cost less than owners would save on utility bills over time; any program loan payment must be less than the customers' energy savings.

Fayetteville became Arkansas' guinea pig when the city adopted a program in 2014. By the next year the program's first participant, the nonprofit Communities Unlimited, had opted in.

"We are very interested in trying to reduce our energy use to be more green and help the environment, but we are also motivated by the financial savings," said Bruce Darr, the nonprofit's director of lending.

After $27,000 in energy improvements on its building -- including replacing all fluorescent lighting with LEDs and planting trees for shade -- the nonprofit is projected to save $5,370 per year, resulting in a five-year loan-repayment period.

Pulaski County moved toward creating its own program after a Quorum Court vote in 2015 established a seven-member program commission with representatives from each of the county's cities. The county then selected three third-party companies to administer the program: Arkansas Advanced Energy Equity, or A2E2, which already administers Fayetteville's program; Jordan Inc., a real estate company; and Ygrene Energy, a California clean-energy financing company.

North Little Rock also put together its own program in 2014 and for the past 12 months has been working with McCain Mall to develop a proposal to take to the city's program commission. A North Little Rock spokesman said the city intends to merge its program with the county's once the mall's proposal has been completed.

Little Rock also has been establishing a program. Despite invitations to join the county's program, the city has so far chosen to operate individually, said Stuart Mackey, the chairman of the Little Rock Property Assessed Clean Energy Commission. With a separate city program in place, property owners living within the city limits could choose between the county's program or the city's.

And rather than bring in third-party administrators, the city's program plans to hire internal administration.

"We feel that's going to lower the cost for the end user, and we think that's ultimately the benefit that we're trying to achieve -- to keep this as inexpensive as possible," Mackey said.

Barry Hyde, county judge of Pulaski County, said he feared having separate programs for the city and county could create unneeded competition and redundancy.

Under the county's terms, the program's three administrators are prohibited from working with Little Rock's program to avoid conflict of interest, County Attorney Adam Fogleman said.

But Hyde still hopes the city's program may one day fold into the county's to create a stronger program with a bigger marketplace more attractive to investors.

"The big thing about this is it's attracting money. This is a lending program, this provides capital for sustainable renovation-type projects," Hyde said. "It's all about having a large enough and strong enough program that it attracts lenders or investors."

"It's a chance for us to take a regional view as opposed to just our little areas -- that's the whole idea of it," Hyde said.

Originally established in 2008 in Berkeley, Calif., Property Assessed Clean Energy programs now exist in 29 states and across more than 1,000 municipalities, according to PACENation, an advocacy organization that tracks the program.

In Arkansas, business interest in energy efficiency is blossoming. The Arkansas Advanced Energy Association, a business coalition dedicated to new energy technologies, has seen its membership grow over the past four years to more than 90 businesses, association Director Steve Patterson said. Patterson also is an operating partner of A2E2.

"Businesses are becoming more conscientious about their energy costs," Patterson said. "Most of this technology is now affordable, whereas before it wasn't."

In Pulaski County, four businesses already have expressed interest in the county's program. Three of them are in Little Rock, Hyde said.

But this kind of loan program is still in its nascent stages -- no other municipalities or counties around the state have anything similar in the works, Patterson said.

"Much of this is driven by the business community, and as businesses in other communities see what's happening in these PACE programs, we're hopeful that they'll apply more pressure on their political leaders to adopt a [PACE] ordinance," he said.


PRESS RELEASE
For immediate release
August 24, 2015

Contact: Steve Patterson, steve@arkansasadvancedenergy.com or (501) 537-0190

Fayetteville PACE Program Closes First Project
Communities Unlimited and IBERIABANK sign deal to save non-profit $5,000 annually

Communities Unlimited logo FAYETTEVILLE, AR — (August 17, 2015) – The City of Fayetteville's model PACE program has funded its first project, Mayor Lioneld Jordan announced this week.

Communities Unlimited, a non-profit foundation focused on advancing community sustainability and entrepreneurial growth, secured a property assessed clean energy (PACE) loan from IBERIABANK this month to finance energy improvements to its 9,000 square foot headquarters that will save the organization approximately $5,000 per year in energy costs.

The Communities Unlimited project becomes the first PACE project funded in Arkansas since the 2013 Arkansas General Assembly adopted Act 1074 enabling local jurisdictions throughout the state to form energy improvement districts and finance PACE loans for property owners. "Since our city became the first Arkansas community to launch a PACE program last year, we have looked forward to this day and we congratulate Communities Unlimited on becoming our first project," Mayor Jordan said today. "Fayetteville is committed to an energy future that is cleaner, more efficient and more reliable. We are proud that Communities Unlimited calls the city home."

"This project is important to us as an organization that encourages entrepreneurship around energy efficiency and renewable energy," said Ines Polonius, CEO of Communities Unlimited. "We are excited to be the first project but we are happier to install these energy efficiency measures that will reduce our carbon footprint and save some money that can be reinvested into our programs."

The seven-member Energy Improvement District Board of Directors, appointed by Mayor Jordan and the Fayetteville City Council, oversees the Fayetteville PACE program.

"Obviously this is a proud day for all of us and we hope today's announcement is a signal to all property owners in the City of Fayetteville that PACE is an accessible option for financing energy improvements that reduce costs and increase cash flow," Board Chairman Michael Phipps said.

Arkansas Advanced Energy Equity (A2E2) is the Fayetteville PACE program administrator. Spokesman Steve Patterson said the first project is entirely the product of Fayetteville enterprises.

"The leadership at Communities Unlimited was highly motivated to complete this deal and they've earned their status as the first project," Patterson said. "Importantly, IBERIABANK of Fayetteville stepped forward as the local lender for this project and Pinnacle Energy Services, also headquartered here, is the project's energy consultant and designer."

"We are proud to partner with Communities Unlimited and wish to congratulate the City of Fayetteville on facilitating the state's first PACE project," said Keaton Smith, Business Banking Relationship Manager of IBERIABANK.

Patterson said that A2E2-Fayetteville has received an additional nine project applications since its formal launch last December and the Communities Unlimited announcement demonstrates that PACE projects "come in all shapes and sizes."

For additional information, download the PDF of the press release, which includes details of the planned energy improvements to the nearly 9,000 square foot Communities Unlimited building.


Contractor Training for Fayetteville PACE program on June 8

Contractor Training on June 8

More than 25 Northwest Arkansas energy contractors including lighting, solar, insulation and energy services joined the A2E2 partners at Fayetteville City Hall on June 8, 2015 for the second in a series of contractor training seminars regarding the city's emerging PACE energy financing program.

Byron DeLear and Tom Appelbaum of A2E2, the city's PACE program administrator, presented details about the innovative PACE financing tool which enables a broad range of energy improvements on properties located in the Fayetteville Energy Improvement District No. 1.  DeLear and Appelbaum emphasized the flexibility of PACE and responded to several questions from contractors.

Video (57 mins.) of the A2E2 energy contractor training session can be viewed here, courtesy of Fayetteville city government.

Earlier, Steve Patterson, also with A2E2, reported to Energy Improvement District Board members on progress of the seven PACE projects currently pending in the program.

Interested contractors who want to become qualified contractors affiliated with the A2E2 Fayetteville PACE program and promoted on the A2E2 website are encouraged to register here: http://a2e2.net/contractorregistration.shtml


PRESS RELEASEPACE Now logo
For immediate release
May 26, 2015

Contact: Shelly Baron, a2e2@arkansasadvancedenergy.com or
(501) 655-2243 cell
Steve Patterson, steve@arkansasadvancedenergy.com or
(501) 537-0190 office

Contractor Training Is June 8 for Fayetteville PACE Program
Training will demonstrate how PACE can generate sales for local businesses

FAYETTEVILLE, AR — Energy and building contractors licensed to do business in the City of Fayetteville are invited to a contractor training program regarding the city's emerging Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing program on June 8, 2015 at City Hall in Fayetteville, according to Steve Patterson with Arkansas Advanced Energy Equity (A2E2), Fayetteville's PACE program administrator.

Since Fayetteville became the state's first city to launch a PACE program in December 2014, numerous property owners have inquired or applied for projects under the innovative financing program. Projects include solar energy systems, heat resistant windows, HVAC upgrades, fresh air systems and lighting improvements.

"The demand is there for a robust PACE program in Fayetteville," Patterson said. "We are at a crucial point where we need more contractors to market and deliver improvements to the city's interested property owners."

A2E2 principals Byron DeLear and Tom Appelbaum will be on hand to conduct the informational seminar for contractors, energy auditors, and consultants to learn about A2E2 financing options and increased sales opportunities for contractors. They will discuss contractor participation terms and conditions, registration requirements, as well as program rules and financing criteria.

"We believe that the energy contracting community will find that A2E2 is an important marketing tool that will help them increase sales and achieve customer satisfaction," said DeLear. "We look forward to having strong, regional contractor participation in the A2E2 program."

What, When, and Where

Energy Contractor Seminar
Monday, June 8, 2015
5:30 – 7:30 pm
Fayetteville City Hall
113 West Mountain Street, Room 326
Fayetteville, AR

There is no charge for the training, but space is limited! Participants are requested to RSVP in advance by calling 501-537-0190 or emailing a2e2@arkansasadvancedenergy.com

Seminar participants may include HVAC Contractors, Commercial Building Energy Consultants, Mechanical Contractors, Solar Energy Companies, Electrical Contractors, Lighting Companies, General Contractors, Construction Companies, Roofing Contractors, Engineering Contractors, and Architects.

The A2E2 program offers opportunities for eligible commercial property owners within the City of Fayetteville to access 100% property-assessed financing for energy efficiency, renewable energy, and water conservation property improvements. A2E2 PACE loans are secured by the property's tax assessment.

Signed into law (Act 1074) by Governor Beebe in April 2013, the Arkansas local-option PACE program authorizes the voluntary creation of energy improvement districts to fund loans for 100% of the cost of energy savings projects by interested property owners. The loans are repaid via a special assessment on the owner's property. Loan payments must be less than the amount of energy savings achieved, so every customer experiences a net positive cash flow.

A2E2.net is the online portal that customers and contractors can use to explore the benefits of PACE financing and learn whether certain property improvements are eligible. Property owners may use the website to submit preliminary applications for project financing and contractors may register online to participate in the program.

To learn more about benefits for certified contractors in the A2E2 PACE program, go to: http://a2e2.net/benefitsforcontractors.shtml.

Arkansas Advanced Energy Equity Program (A2E2) is an innovative method for commercial property owners to finance energy improvements. The program is administered by A2E2, LLC on behalf of the City of Fayetteville, AR Energy Improvement District, Jim Halsell, Chairman. A2E2, LLC was incorporated in Arkansas in 2014 as a joint venture by the Arkansas Advanced Energy Association (AAEA) and Energy Equity Funding (EEF), a company that also administers Set the PACE St. Louis.

You can download a PDF of this press release to print and/or to forward to colleagues.


Arkansas Business MagazineArkansas Business
By Steve Patterson
Jan. 12, 2015

Advanced Energy Jobs Number 25,000 in Arkansas

In a commentary article by Steve Patterson in Arkansas Business, a recent study released by the Arkansas Advanced Energy Foundation looks at the number of jobs in the advanced energy economy in our state. "The development of innovative technologies to help meet America's energy demands has allowed the emergence of an advanced energy sector that now accounts for the employment of more than 25,000 Arkansans". To see article, click here.

Steve Patterson is executive director of Arkansas Advanced Energy Association (AAEA), a partner in A2E2. Arkansas Advanced Energy Foundation is the non-profit research and education component of AAEA.


KUAF National Public Radio 91.3KUAF Radio logo
By Timothy Dennis 4:40
Dec. 15, 2014

Fayetteville Launches Clean Energy Development Program

Last week, city officials celebrated the launch of Arkansas' first Property Assessed Clean Energy district, a program that allows some property owners to get loans for energy efficiency, renewable energy or water conservation projects which are paid for through annual property tax assessments.

Go to KUAF website and click blue triangle next to "Listen 4:40" below Fayetteville program headline.


NWA Online & The Northwest Arkansas TimesPost Dispatch Business 10/13/13
By Joel Walsh
December 13, 2014

Post Dispatch Business 10/13/13Fayetteville Launches Energy
Improvement Program

Financing Tool Will Allow Property Owners To Borrow Money For Energy Improvements

FAYETTEVILLE— A new financing tool is available for businesses and landlords planning to make energy efficiency upgrades to their properties.

City officials and representatives for the state's first energy improvement district formally launched the city's property assessed clean energy -- or PACE -- program Thursday.

AT A GLANCE | Property Assessed Clean Energy
Steve Patterson of A2E2, the company administering Fayetteville's property assessed clean energy financing program, said company representatives plan to offer more workshops for contractors or property owners interested in taking advantage of the financing sometime after the first of the year. For more information, go to A2E2.net. Source: Staff Report

The program allows property owners to borrow money for various improvements, including solar panels, energy efficient lighting, insulation, roofs and water heaters. Loans are paid over a period of up to 20 years via a special assessment on the owner's property tax bill.

"You're saving money from the energy expenses, and then you're paying that money back through your property taxes," Tom Applebaum, a representative for the newly formed company, A2E2 LLC, told about 25 contractors, energy auditors and other interested parties during a seminar Thursday at the Public Library.

A2E2 will administer the program and collect a commission on all loans. The Washington County Assessor's office will also charge a fee. The city isn't liable if borrowers default on their loans.

One of the attendees at Thursday's seminar, Bill Freeland, who owns Eureka Energy Audit in Eureka Springs, said the program has the ability to remove the upfront cost of energy improvement that can serve as a barrier for businesses wanting to upgrade.

Rather than a substantial down payment, as would be the case with traditional lending, borrowers can get a loan for 100 percent of the improvement and begin paying back the loan the following October when property taxes are due.

Freeman said the financing tool could be especially attractive to "mom and pop" businesses that don't have a lot of money set aside for capital improvement.

"A $500 or $600 per month savings for them is hugely important," Freeman said.

Another key aspect is the assessment stays with the property rather than with the borrower. Supporters say that makes the financing mechanism more attractive to business owners who don't know if they'll be in the same building for another 20 years.

Arkansas legislators in April 2013 enacted a law making the financing possible. The law enables cities, counties or the state to create energy improvement districts, which have the authority to issue tax-exempt bonds, loan money and link repayments to property taxes. Only two municipalities, Fayetteville and North Little Rock, have taken advantage of the legislation so far.

Fayetteville's energy improvement district formed about a year ago. Since then, its seven volunteer members set parameters for loans and selected an administrator for the program. The administrator, A2E2, formed as a partnership between the Arkansas Advanced Energy Association in Little Rock and Energy Equity Funding, a company administering St. Louis' program.

Fayetteville's energy improvement district will not immediately issue bonds. Instead, A2E2 will work with banks and other traditional lending institutions to provide loans to interested borrowers.

Steve Patterson, executive director of the Advanced Energy Association and a principal with A2E2, said interest rates will vary based on the length of the loan, its size and a borrower's credit history. Byron DeLear, chairman and CEO of Energy Equity Funding, said he expects rates to be in the 3 percent to 6.5 percent range.

DeLear said his company has administered roughly $10 million worth of the loans in St. Louis since summer 2013.

Energy Equity Funding's first project was a boutique pet store that borrowed about $100,000 to install rooftop solar panels. According to the company's website, the panels will produce more than 11,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity annually, enough to power 35 personal computers or 264 compact-fluorescent light bulbs each year.

DeLear also described a much larger project. Prologis, an industrial logistics real estate company, borrowed $1.4 million to retrofit a commercial office tower in San Francisco, where the company is headquartered. The money was used to replace lighting fixtures, install rooftop solar panels and overhaul the building's heating, ventilation and air-conditioning system. According to estimates, the upgrades are projected to reduce the building's utility bills by about $98,000 annually.

DeLear said, aside from monetary savings, the program's financing can grow property values, reduce energy consumption and create jobs for companies that would be doing the retrofitting.

"We view PACE financing as, say, five years from now, it's going to be a normal portion of every single real estate development," he added.

The financing mechanism isn't yet equipped for single-family homeowners in Fayetteville.

Because repayment is made as a special assessment on borrowers' property tax bills, a lien from the energy improvement district takes priority over a primary mortgage lender's lien.

That has caused concern for the Federal Housing Finance Authority, the agency regulating Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and several home loan banks.

James Lockhart, the authority's former director, issued a 2009 guidance letter saying, "These loans create an additional potential for the loss of a home through a tax sale or foreclosure if the consumer cannot meet the extra debt burden."

Local supporters, including Mayor Lioneld Jordan, still want homeowners to be able to take advantage of the program eventually.

"We remain committed to developing a residential PACE program as soon as the federal government acts to remove barriers," Jordan said Thursday.

It's yet to be seen how many property owners will use the new financing tool.

None have signed up for the program yet, but John Coleman, director of the Northwest Arkansas regional office for Viridian, a green building consulting company, said Thursday he has several clients who have expressed interest.


NWA Homepage.comNWA Homepage.com logo
By Kyle Leyenberger
Dec. 12, 2014

Loan Program Promotes Energy Efficiency

FAYETTEVILLE— The City of Fayetteville is offering property owners a new way to cut utility bills, becoming the first in the state to offer a PACE program.

The Property Assessed Clean Energy Program offers up front loans to improve a building's energy efficiency.

"We really preach a whole building analysis type approach," says Peter Nierengarten, Director of Sustainability and Resilience for the city of Fayetteville. "HVAC, insulation, air sealing and duct sealing, a lot of that stuff is not very sexy, but it's very cost effective in terms of bang for buck."

Solar panels, low flow fixtures and LED lighting can also qualify.

"It works seamlessly with utility incentives that already exist through SWEPCO, Sourcegas and Ozarks Electric," Nierengarten says.

The loan is tied to property taxes, keeping interest rates low, and spreading out payments. Nierengarten says that means the projects pay off immediately.

"The energy savings per month is greater than the monthly payment on that loan to do those improvements," he says. "It can help stimulate the economy by creating jobs in the clean energy sector. It can help reduce folks' utility bills... It will help reduce our dependence on the fluctuating prices of fossil fuels."

Fayetteville's leaders hope to get other local cities on board.

"We're hopeful we can show a successful program here in Fayetteville, and that success will breed replication, and others will be eager to join our district," he says.

Right now, most homeowners cannot participate in the program, because of complications with mortgage lenders. Fayetteville hopes to see that change soon, but for now they are focusing on commercial, multifamily, and industrial properties.

For more information or to apply, visit this site.


Video of press conference for A2E2 launch in Fayetteville 13:32
Fayetteville Public Library, December 11, 2014
Speakers:
Mayor Lioneld Jordan, City of Fayetteville, Arkansas
Julie Trivitt, Fayetteville Energy Improvement District, Chairwoman of Board
Steve Patterson, A2E2, LLC


PRESS RELEASEPACE Now logo
For immediate release
December 11, 2014

Contact: Shelly Baron, a2e2@arkansasadvancedenergy.com or
(501) 655-2243 cell
Steve Patterson, steve@arkansasadvancedenergy.com

A2E2-Fayetteville is State's First PACE Financing Program to Launch
Kickoff Announcement, Contractor Seminar Scheduled Dec. 11, 2014

FAYETTEVILLE, AR — Nearly four years after announcing his support for an innovative energy financing concept called Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE), Fayetteville Mayor Lioneld Jordan will become the state's first Mayor to formally launch a city-wide program on Thursday, December 11.

A press conference is scheduled at 1:00 pm in the front lobby of the Fayetteville Public Library, 401 W. Mountain St. The media and public are invited to attend.

The program is called Arkansas Advanced Energy Equity (A2E2) and will be administered by A2E2, LLC, which was incorporated in Arkansas earlier this year by the Arkansas Advanced Energy Association (AAEA) and Energy Equity Funding (EEF), a company that also administers Set the PACE St. Louis.

A2E2 press conference launch Dec. 11, 2014 "Fayetteville is committed to an energy future that is cleaner, more efficient and more reliable," said Mayor Jordan. "The A2E2 energy financing program is an opportunity for Fayetteville property owners to save energy costs and make their buildings and homes more valuable. A2E2 is creating green jobs that will help build Fayetteville's future."

The Fayetteville City Council moved in October, 2013, to adopt an ordinance creating Energy Improvement District #1 as authorized by PACE-enabling legislation enacted by the Arkansas General Assembly in April. The District's Board of Directors met for the first time in February of this year.

"This is wonderful day for Fayetteville and especially for all of my colleagues who volunteer on the Board of Directors for the Energy Improvement District," said Julie Trivitt, Chairwoman. "The board embraced our role as the 'pathfinder' for PACE in Arkansas and took every effort to ensure this is a program that our Mayor and our community can be proud of."

The A2E2 program offers opportunities for eligible commercial property owners within the City of Fayetteville to access 100% property-assessed financing for energy efficiency, renewable energy, and water conservation property improvements. The A2E2 loans will be secured by the property's tax assessment.

In addition to Mayor Jordan, speakers at the press conference will include David Johnson, Fayetteville Public Library Executive Director; Julie Trivitt, Fayetteville Energy Improvement District Chairwoman of the Board; and Steve Patterson, A2E2, LLC.

"A2E2 is excited to work with the City of Fayetteville Energy Improvement District Board to launch the state's first PACE program," said Steve Patterson with A2E2 and the Executive Director of Arkansas Advanced Energy Association (AAEA). "We appreciate the Mayor's leadership and believe that his city's commercial property owners will now be rewarded with tremendous energy savings opportunities."

Contractor fourum for A2E2 launch Dec. 11, 2014 Following the press conference, A2E2 specialists Byron DeLear and Tom Applebaum will conduct an informational seminar for contractors, energy auditors, and consultants to learn about A2E2 financing options and increased sales opportunities for contractors. DeLear and Applebaum will discuss contractor participation terms and conditions, registration requirements, as well as program rules and financing criteria.

"We believe that the energy contracting community will find that A2E2 is an important marketing tool that will help them increase sales and achieve customer satisfaction," said DeLear, CEO of Energy Equity Funding. "We look forward to having strong, regional contractor participation in the A2E2 program."

Signed into law (Act 1074) by Governor Beebe in April 2013, the Arkansas local-option PACE program authorizes the voluntary creation of energy improvement districts to fund loans for 100% of the cost of energy savings projects by interested property owners. The loans are repaid via a special assessment on the owner's property. Loan payments must be less than the amount of energy savings achieved, so every customer experiences a net positive cash flow.

The program's website is also being launched on December 11. A2E2.net is the online portal that customers and contractors can use to explore the benefits of PACE financing and learn whether certain property improvements are eligible. Property owners may use the website to submit preliminary applications for project financing and contractors may register online to participate in the program.

Members of the media are encouraged to attend: Contact Shelly Baron to arrange interviews in advance at a2e2@arkansasadvancedenergy.com or (501) 655-2243 (cell)

To read a summary of the Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) legislation, click here: http://arkansasadvancedenergy.com/files/dmfile/PACESUMMARY.2.13.pdf

Arkansas Advanced Energy Equity Program (A2E2) is an innovative method for commercial property owners to finance energy improvements. The program is administered by A2E2, LLC on behalf of the City of Fayetteville, AR Energy Improvement District, Julie Trivitt, Chairwoman. A2E2, LLC was incorporated in Arkansas earlier this year by the Arkansas Advanced Energy Association (AAEA) and Energy Equity Funding (EEF), a company that also administers Set the PACE St. Louis.

Arkansas Advanced Energy Equity Program
501.537.0190
info@A2E2.net
Watch our video on the advantages
of PACE financing